• Oliver Boon

Critic Meets Fabrizio Daniele

Updated: Apr 28




CRITIC

What made you want to be an actor?

FABRIZIO

I think I was just a very curious individual. I never had this childhood dream of becoming an actor. I never knew what I wanted to become when I was older. I was so curious about so many different jobs that every day I wanted to be something else. Until I realized that acting would actually give me the chance to do all these things without having to choose!

CRITIC

How are you adjusting to life during Self-Isolation?

FABRIZIO

Well, you know the whole Coronavirus situation right now, it's kind of a blessing in disguise because I have time now to catch up with a lot of things that are ongoing right now. I keep busy with a lot of different things. I have like seven, eight projects ongoing. I’m going over my monologues every morning. I’m writing little scenes. I wrote a short film. I do a lot of social media for other actors. So there’s a lot of editing and strategy work. I created websites for a bunch of people. I recently took over the Speak LA YouTube channel.

CRITIC

Tell me more about Speak LA.

FABRIZIO

Speak LA is a community created by Jen and Camille. They’re actors here in LA who basically talk about how they didn't speak the language of Los Angeles and the Industry. So they create videos and podcasts to build a community which helps the young actors that arrive in Los Angeles to understand the business, the city and all of the things that come up within an acting career.

CRITIC

What about your own YouTube Channel you’ve been working on?

FABRIZIO

It's pretty fresh. It's been a month now. I really underestimated the amount of work that comes with a YouTube channel. People think it's easy. Technically, if you just do it simple, you can get it done easily, but the amount of work that you have to put in, research, what you're talking about, what other people already talked about on that topic, who your audience is going to be, how they're going to react to it, what they like, what they don't like, it's a lot of research. It's a whole science in itself that you have to really dig into, to learn how to use it and to make your views and to push your YouTube channel to be viewed and beating the algorithm. It's a lot of work, but, I like it a lot. I like exploring these things and putting myself out there. I learn every single day that I work on it. It's an ongoing experience. I don't think my career's gonna be YouTube. It’s really just a tool I use to talk about things that I think are important that are not talked enough about. It's just another way to put myself out there. To put my face and my brand into the world.

CRITIC

Now, I’m going to ask you about a project that I am also a part of so… FULL DISCLAIMER TO THE READERS, what is Momus Films?


FABRIZIO

Momus Films is a project that me and my actor friends set up and you're one of them. Basically, we create our own opportunities through Momus Films. We have a pretty professional brand. You can tell we've put in a lot of effort and work, which is what we do. Most of our films are basically a toolbox to work on things so we don't have to go and find people that have this toolbox because we have our own. That's how I see it. It's crazy how many people start getting in touch with us regarding their short films and ideas. Some people are really ahead and well prepared and they really want to do something. Then you also have people that are just, “oh, here I wrote a script. Can we film it next week?” “No.” I really see this as our own toolbox that we can carry around to work on our own stuff. Just thinking back, this last year, we did four short films in Los Angeles and are working on number five. There are people that come to LA that don't get one short film done and I'm not saying we're perfect or we're young Spielbergs but we get things done and I think that's really good. It shows that we're not just sitting and waiting for us to be called.


CRITIC

You’ve told me before but I’m curious if it’s still the same, what is your favorite movie?

FABRIZIO

I don't know why but I think it’s still ‘The Graduate’ with Dustin Hoffman because it's just such a beautiful way of storytelling, through the visuals and sounds. It was just a new era of Hollywood that started with this movie. I don't think there are a lot of great movies out there but the greatest would be one movie that was revolutionary to the whole industry and that's why I think it's to this day one of my all-time favorites.

CRITIC

This is one of my favorite questions to ask, what would be your dream role?

FABRIZIO

This might sound silly but if they ever do a remake of ‘My Cousin Vinnie’, I want to be Joe Pesci’s character, the New York lawyer in Alabama. It's so silly but I just love it so much.

CRITIC

What was a movie or play you saw recently that had an impact on you?

FABRIZIO

Nothing that is in the movies right now but yesterday I watched 'Pitch Perfect' for the first time. When people look at me, they have all these ideas of who I am or who I might be and all that. I'm so in love with like the slightest romantic comedies. I don't know what it is about them. Maybe because it allows me to feel like the people in the movies. I don't know what it is about 'Pitch Perfect' but I really liked it. At the beginning, I was like "I don't know about this with these college girls singing" but by the end I was like "this is great!".

CRITIC

Can you share with our readers some great advice you’ve been given by a director or someone you look up to?


FABRIZIO

The greatest advice ever was during my graduation play on Ken Ludwig’s ‘Moon Over Buffalo’. Two days before we went up, I was almost crying about this huge opening monologue I had at the beginning of the second act where my character was completely drunk. It's a 15-minute monologue where I’m all by myself on stage and I worked so hard on all these little details but it just wasn't there. I went to my director Joe Garcia and asked him “what’s going on? I haven’t found it yet and we go up in two days!” He asked, “Do you see me panicking?” I said, “no”. He replied, “Well then, don't panic”. He never mentioned anything about it ever again. I was so at the end of the road with that monologue, I had done it over and over and worked so hard on it, that him telling me not to panic, I was just like, you know whatever happens, happens. On opening night, it was the best I've ever felt on a stage and it was amazing. He and everyone loved it. The advice that came through this was to let go and accept that I have done enough work and it's all gonna be there in the moment. The magic is gonna happen. I just have to trust it will. You know how many teachers and acting coaches tell you to go to work and trust your work but I never could do it. But Joe did it to me by just saying, you know what, who cares? The moment you care about the outcome, you're going to get stuck. Ever since, I rehearse and I work and then the day of the performance comes and I'm like, whatever happens, happens. I don't care if I lose all of my lines on stage. It's beautiful. You never know what's going to happen. That was really the turning point in my acting that really made me who I am today. You can only do that though when you know you put a lot of work and effort in. If you think you can just memorize lines and see what happens, that's gonna go badly. When you know that you did all the work possible, then you can allow yourself to let go on stage.

CRITIC

Who are some of your acting heroes?


FABRIZIO

I mean Al Pacino, Robert De Niro and all those types for sure. They’re all just amazing actors. One of the actors that I actually really look up to is Will Smith. The main reason being that he worked his ass off. There is an interview with Will Smith when he first got cast where he basically memorized all of his lines, and all of his scene partner’s lines, too. So, while they were filming, he was basically saying all the lines in the scene as well, because he was so scared. He didn’t want to leave no stone unturned. This may seem silly but Arnold Schwarzenegger, his career is admirable, not because he's the best leading actor on the planet or anything like that. It’s because he came to the United States from a small Austrian village with no English knowledge, no real resources. He was Mr. Universe, sure, but out of that, making it into an acting career when it was like the time of the Al Pacino’s and the Dustin Hoffman's, you know, the little method guys. Then you have like this huge tank and he hustled a lot. He struggled, but he put in his head that he wanted to be a movie star and he did it. I admire people like that. I don't care what level they are or how good they are. It's all about where you are, what you have, and what you do with what you have.

CRITIC

Give me and the readers a special place in Los Angeles that you like to go to?

FABRIZIO

Spire 73. It's the highest rooftop bar in the West Coast. The place is a little expensive, but I like going there. Not a lot of people know about it. I think that's my hidden spot. The beach as well. I don't go very often because it's a little far away for me. When I have time, I like to go and relax a little bit. Either the beach at Santa Monica or Venice.

CRITIC

Favorite Word?

FABRIZIO

Oblivious. I learned today that some of the characters I tend to play are oblivious. I believe this is not hundred percent negative, right? I just like the sound of the word too.

CRITIC

What about advice to an aspiring actor, moving out to LA for the first time?

FABRIZIO

Well, I would tell them, be ready to sacrifice in order to get to the bigger picture. Never stop working, and never stop believing. You can only believe as long as you work hard every single day. You can’t just come here and believe in a dream. That's not going to work. Like the good old Arnold Schwarzenegger said, “you cannot climb the ladder of success with your hands in your pocket” You have to use your hands. You have to get dirty. You have to work.

www.fabriziodaniele.com

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www.youtube.com/c/FabrizioDaniele

www.facebook.com/iamfabriziodaniele

www.linkedin.com/in/fabrizio-daniele/




Interviewed by Oliver Boon on Zoom